Posts tagged guano
Can bat guano be used as a fertilizer?
 

Guano is actually an amazing fertilizer, as it is high in potassium nitrate, which plants love. Consider placing the BatBnB above a low-traffic, non-edible garden bed and the guano will help the plants grow big and strong. Be mindful however, that if too much guano is accumulated it could burn the plant like too much of any fertilizer, too much nitrogen.  Interestingly enough, the potassium nitrate can also be extracted and used in gunpowder and explosives; guano was an important resource for that purpose during the American Civil War. Bat guano has also been found to preserve fossils.

Is guano dangerous?
 

Avoid touching or breathing in any guano personally, just as you would normally avoid any wild animal droppings. You’re actually more likely to get histoplasmosis from bird droppings than bat droppings, but nonetheless, steer clear of bat droppings and be safe. If you’re ever inclined to move your BatBnB or clean it up close during the winter after it’s already been occupied, then be sure to wear proper respiratory masks and goggles, and don’t breath in any dust. In general though, if you’ve never been overly concerned about bird poop in your life, then guano shouldn’t bother you.

What about my dogs and cats? Will they have any issues with the bats?
 

If you place your bat house according to instructions, occupants are unlikely to be caught by cats as it will be too high up for them. Dogs will have as much as interest in guano as they do any bird poop and are very unlikely to ever interact with a bat. We recommend that all your animals be vaccinated for rabies, as is common practice. If your house pet ever brings a bat into the house, call animal control to properly care for or safely dispose of the animal. Never handle the bat yourself.

How do I account for guano droppings?
 

Bats, just like birds, actually prefer to poop while in flight, so most of the guano droppings will fall as bird droppings do, out of sight and out of mind. That said, their will be some guano coming out of the BatBnB, which is why we recommend mounting the BatBnB above a low-use and non-edible garden bed or lawn. That way the guano will actually act as a fertilizer for the lawn or bushes growing underneath. The only complaint we’ve ever seen about guano is an individual who mounted their BatBnB right above the door to their house, so naturally they got some guano on their shoes… so that was a bad idea. Some guano may appear on the lower landing pads, but should mostly wash away when it rains. The BatBnB also extends an inch off the wall, so most of the guano won't hit the side of the house (if that's where you want it mounted), and even if it does, rain will help, and if it ever gets too bad you can use a pressure washer in the winter months when the bats are hibernating.

Where should I hang my BatBnB?
 

Check out our Hanging Guide for details. BatBnBs should ideally be placed 15-20 feet from the ground on a wall, shed, barn, or post that receives 6-7+ hours of direct sunlight each day. Keep them away from areas with heavy foot traffic, and make sure the guano can fall into a low traffic, non-edible garden bed or lawn where it won't disturb you or anyone in your family -- the plants will love the natural fertilizer! Trees are almost never a viable option, they should always be a last resort as they often house predators and can obstruct necessary sunlight. If you must choose a tree, make sure it’s 15 feet or more away from the nearest branch, and that it still receives the necessary sunlight.