When will I be able to purchase a BatBnB?

BatBnB will be available for pre-order through Indiegogo crowdfunding on Wednesday July 26th. We have wrapped up our prototyping phase and have the final designs ready for production. We are currently working with a few finalist manufacturers to determine the best partner for us. Sign up below to be the first to get access to the campaign and take advantage of early bird pricing.  
 

How much will a BatBnB cost?

We will be revealing the final prices on launch day. We are confident that our model will be competitive in pricing to existing bat houses on the market, especially consider how much more a BatBnB offers in terms of function, quality and aesthetic.
 

How soon will bats settle into my BatBnB?

Studies have shown that the majority of well made bat houses will be populated within the first or second year after deployment. Best news is that once a bats have moved in, they are very likely to come back year after year.  Some researchers tracking bats have documented bat houses being populated as soon as 24 hours after being put up. BatBnB does not guarantee your unit will get occupied, but will offer detailed guides on maximizing your chances for occupancy.
 

Are there commercial uses for BatBnB?

Absolutely. Agricultural research reports often footnote bat populations as an important component of natural pest control for farmers. We will be offering special bulk discounts for farmers and other businesses like golf courses, city centers, and state parks that would like to deploy multiple BatBnB units around their property. We also see a use case for hotel chains and even local municipalities to minimize mosquito populations in a stylish and non-invasive way.

 

How do I attract bats to my property?

Bats live almost anywhere there is moderate climate and insects. The key to getting them to find your BatBnB is in placement. Sun is most important. Each unit needs at least 6+ hours of direct sunlight each day. Placing them on the side of a house, barn, or shed is the best placement. Trees can work, but with less chances of success since they offer too much shade and easy perches for predators. If you do prefer to place it on a tree, make sure it is at least 15 feet from the nearest branch where predators can perch. You must place your unit between 12-20 feet up, higher the better. Having a natural water source (pond, stream, brook, etc.) within a mile of your property is ideal, but not necessarily a deal breaker. Small things like having water features and night-blooming flowers can also help attract bats.
 

Are bats safe to have in my yard?

Yes. Bats have been culturally misrepresented by popular media; vampires, dracula, halloween, etc. In reality bats are friendly forest critters that just want to stay out of your way and eat insects. Bats are also incredibly clean since they groom themselves like cats, and have virtually no interest in flying into your hair, since they don't even build nests in the first place. It is important to treat bats with respect, and they should never be handled or treated as pets.  If you ever want to move your BatBnB unit, wait until the winter when the bats have moved on to hibernation and safely vacated the unit.
 

Don’t bats have rabies?

There are hundreds of thousands of bats living in bat houses across North America, and there's not a single recorded case of a bat house owner being attacked by a bat. You’re more likely to catch leprosy or be killed by your lawnmower than you are to die from bat-related rabies. Out of a population of 320 million in the USA, there are only 1-3 reported cases of rabies each year. Only a portion of those can be drawn back to bats, and of the few bat-related cases, almost half of them are from people who actively handled bats when they should have known to call animal control. Less than half a percent of the bat population ever carry rabies, and those that do die off very quickly.
 

Will bats ever fly into my house?

It’s important to treat your new bat friends just like you would any wildlife critters or birds in your yard. Never try to touch or handle the animals. On the very rare occasion that a bat would find it's way into your home, call your local animal control, and do not try and handle the bat yourself. On the very rare occasion that you be bitten or scratched by a bat, go immediately to the hospital. While the odds are infinitesimally small that the bat was carrying rabies, it's better to be safe than sorry.  
 

What if I already have bats in my attic?

That's actually great. Well, other than the not being able to sleep at night part. Several leading animal control professionals advertise that once bats are excluded from an attic, they'll try to find a new home nearby in your shed, barn, or even at a neighbor’s house. They recommend putting up a bat house or two further back in your yard to offer the bats an option to quickly relocate without disrupting their summer breeding. This keeps the bats safe and stops them from going back into your attic.
 

Can I paint my BatBnB?

Yes you can. In fact, experts have shown that painting a bat house can increase occupancy rates by as much as 50%. Bat houses in warmer areas, such as the southern United States, may benefit from light colored paint, while colder areas, such as the northern U. S. and Canada, may benefit from a darker color to help absorb more warmth from the sun.

 

What do you use for materials?  

We are using kiln dried Western Red Cedar and stainless steel screws. We are only using water based finishes and outdoor grade paints which actually increase occupation rates.

 

Why are bats so important?

Bats are critical. They keep the vast numbers of pests and insects in check, pollinate flowers, and carry seeds for critically important plants. Bats also safeguard our health by reducing demands for toxic pesticides—one of our planet’s most serious, but too often ignored, health threats. Furthermore, bats are highly resistant to cancer, arthritis, and many scary diseases lethal to humans. Why not investigate how knowledge of bats can be used to improve our own survival?